My father-in-law continues to grow a great vegetable garden. He says he's getting lazier by the year. At 84 he still has all the seedlings and seeds in before the May long weekend and tends every row. He doesn't need to guess what will do well and where it should be. What he means by lazy is that for the past few years he has dug up only the row area in preparation, rather than turning over the whole garden with a shovel. And this spring rather than the whole row, he dug up the spots where the seedlings would be planted. Sounds smart to me. My father-in-law continues to grow a great vegetable garden. He says he's getting lazier by the year. At 84 he still has all the seedlings and seeds in before the May long weekend and tends every row. He doesn't need to guess what will do well and where it should be. What he means by lazy is that for the past few years he has dug up only the row area in preparation, rather than turning over the whole garden with a shovel. And this spring rather than the whole row, he dug up the spots where the seedlings would be planted. Sounds smart to me.

Turning over the whole garden is thorough and gets rid of a lot of potential issues. It raises others. To work it all over feels very satisfying, or very tiring (depends how you look at it). The pleasure of getting further along in age is the perspective this offers. What really matters?

Reminds me of a paragraph in Richard Rohr's Falling Upward:

"In the second half of life, one has less and less need or interest in eliminating the negative or fearful, making rash judgments, holding on to old hurts, or feeling any need to punish other people. Your superiority complexes have gradually departed in all directions. You do not fight these things anymore; they have just shown themselves too many times to be useless, ego-based, counterproductive, and often entirely wrong. You learn to positively ignore and withdraw your energy from evil or stupid things rather than fight them directly."

Somehow this approach makes room for a lot more freedom. Could that be because, as they say, what we resist persists? Opposing something ties me right down to the issue. And there sure are times when I know it's time to do what I can to pursue justice. Like digging and preparing the hole for each seedling. It's not so bad if there's a dandelion on the path between, seems to me.